The 1500 Stories podcast cracks open the uncomfortable subjects of money and economic class.  If you want a peek inside the kinds of experiences people usually don’t share in casual conversation, listen to 1500 Stories. While the website features individual narratives, the podcast combines and weaves together many voices on a different theme each episode.

Episode 1: The trailer

Listen to the trailer now for the first season of the 1500 Stories podcast. Episodes will drop on the second and fourth Thursday of the month and be found wherever you listen to podcasts. Season 1 includes a three episode mini-series about how Americans think about middle-classness and a four episode mini-series about farm work and rural life. Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music/Audible, Radio Public, Spotify, Player.fm, and coming soon to Radio.com and I Heart Radio.

You can help support the podcast and my ongoing creative work (which has been entirely a labor of love above and beyond my day job) by becoming a patron at https://www.patreon.com/jenmyhre, by leaving a review on your podcast app, and by sharing both podcast and my Patreon link in your social networks.

Episode 2 (first full episode): Not Rich Not Poor

The Show Notes for Not Rich Not Poor

To explore the data on economic inequality in the U.S., check out:

A 2019 report on the economic well-being of U.S. households by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System

Billionaire Bonanza, a 2018 report on the richest Americans by Chuck Collins and Josh Hoxie

Median personal income in the United States, summarized by the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis Economic Research

The U.S. Census Bureau’s data on median household income

An interactive graphic by the Wall Street Journal to figure out your own percentile in the U.S. population

To explore the data on how Americans identify themselves in terms of class, check out:

What Determines How Americans Perceive Their Social Class?” by Robert Bird and Frank Newport, February 27, 2017

Few Consider Themselves Wealthy, Even Among Highest Earners” by Rasmussen Reports, October 23, 2018

Sociology References

Kelley, Jonathan & M.D.R. Evans.  1995.  “Class and Class Conflict in Six Western Nations.”  American Sociological Review, 60(2), 157-178.

Sosnaud, Benjamin, David Brady, & Steven M. Frenk.  2013.  “Class in Name Only: Subjective Class Identity, Objective Class Position and Vote Choice in American Presidential Elections.”  Social Problems, 60(1), 81-99.

This episode was written, produced and edited by Jennifer R. Myhre, with editing assistance from Lea Li and Deven Sutaria.  The music that opens and closes each 1500 Stories episode was composed and produced by Benjamin Henderson. Additional music was composed by Jesus Correa.  The 1500 Stories podcast was launched thanks to generous financial assistance from the Mellon Foundation and American Council of Learned Societies community college faculty fellowship program.  However, any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed here are our own and do not necessarily represent those of Mellon or ACLS.  Thanks to Melanie Bennetts, Lea Li, Elizabeth Mjelde, and Melinda Poley for their ears in early stages of drafting this episode.

Episode 3: The Happy Medium

The Show Notes for The Happy Medium

To explore American opinions about meritocracy, the American Dream and the possibility of upward mobility, check out:

2018 Pew Research Center data about what Americans think about why people are rich or poor

2018 Gallup Poll data about what Americans mean by ‘working class’

To explore ‘stickiness’ in American socioeconomic status, check out:

A 2016 Brookings Institution comparison of upward mobility in nations around the globe

A 2016 Brooking Institution report on intergenerational mobility

A 2012 Pew Charitable Trust report on economic mobility

A 2015 Russell Sage Foundation and Pew Charitable Trust report on economic mobility

A 2007 National Bureau of Economic Research report on mobility in the U.S. since 1937

Sociology References:

Adair, Vivyan C. 2005. “US Working-Class/Poverty-Class Divides.” Sociology 39(5): 817-834.

Adair, Vivyan C.  2001.  “Branded with Infamy: Inscriptions of Poverty and Class in the United States.”  Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 27(2), 451-471.

Coser, Lewis A. 1965. “The Sociology of Poverty: To the Memory of Georg Simmel.” Social Problems 13(2): 140-148.

Fothergill, Alice. 2003. “The Stigma of Charity: Gender, Class and Disaster Assistance.” The Sociological Quarterly 44(4): 659-680.

Sayer, Andrew.  2005.  “Class, Moral Worth and Recognition.”  Sociology, 39(5), 947-963.

Sayer, Andrew.  2002.  “What Are You Worth: Why Class Is an Embarrassing Subject.”  Sociological Research Online, 7(3), <http://www.socresonline.org.uk/7/3/sayer.html>.

Schwalbe, Michael. 2014. Rigging the Game: How Inequality Is Reproduced in Everyday Life. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Sherman, Jennifer. 2013. “Surviving the Great Recession: Growing Need and the Stigmatized Safety Net.” Social Problems 60(4): 409-432.

Click here to read a transcript of the podcast. This episode was written, produced and edited by Jennifer R. Myhre, with editing assistance from Lea Li and Deven Sutaria.  The music that opens and closes each 1500 Stories episode was composed and produced by Benjamin Henderson. Additional music was composed by Jesus Correa.  The 1500 Stories podcast was launched thanks to generous financial assistance from the Mellon Foundation and American Council of Learned Societies community college faculty fellowship program.  However, any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed here are our own and do not necessarily represent those of Mellon or ACLS.  Thanks to Melanie Bennetts, Lea Li, Elizabeth Mjelde, and Melinda Poley for their ears in early stages of drafting this episode.

The 1500 Stories Logo with the phrase The Podcast superimposed over it, with the tag line "no matter where we fall on the economic ladder, everyone has a story"